Nolite Te Bastardes Carborundorum D L T B G Y D

31May/070

Cindy Sheehan’s retirement speech

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It is hard to argue with the unbelievably bleak view of America presented by this short goodbye. The only thing she said I really disagree with is the end. I think we will eventually leave Iraq, but it really has gone on an unbelievable amount of time past any kind of reason. Never mind it was a complete farce in the first place.

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29May/070

OMGCARLOL

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Chewbacca's on a scooter man, HOLY CRAP!

29May/070

Some FDL for yas

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This is a great article about how acknowledging something's existence does not = saying it's the best thing in the world. Called "A Mile In My Enemy's Shoes" over at Firedoglake. Talks alot about how the U.S. has passed up alot of opportunities in the name of refusing to deal with terrorists that could have drastically reduced terrorism.

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22May/070

At Least the US isn’t the Only Country Getting in on Nasty Arms Dealing

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Thierry sent me this article from the Guardian about Britain's virtual no questions asked arms export policies. This was my favorite part:

Over the past four years, 199 export licences have been approved to the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands and the Channel Islands - territories without armies. The equipment includes small arms and ammunition, anti-riot shields, CS hand grenades, crowd-control ammunition and even nuclear, biological, chemical filters and respirators (for the Cayman Islands). It is anybody's guess where this equipment is destined.

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22May/070

If George Bush can’t be impeached, what’s the point of impeachment?

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I have said this before, but it is more true every time and thus I feel bears repeating. This is a president who broke the law, said so on national television, is incredibly unpopular, and has probably done more damage to the US Government than any other one individual in history. This Think Progress link is talking about his COMPLETELY dodging questions about the Comey business. That's touching on his TOTALLY BREAKING THE LAW thing. It used to be he was at least very popular, which made it somewhat hard to think he could be brought down. Now he's so unpopular he doesn't even bother lying about things like this story where he's totally threatening to veto a bill if they include raises for military families. How can anyone get away with that?
Lieberman is going on about how much more "civility" we need in government today. That is exactly the opposite of what we need. Politeness cannot extend to people who are literally getting hundreds of people killed every week. Politeness cannot extend to excusing people for breaking the law to take away people's civil liberties. Can anyone offer me any viable reason this president should not be impeached?

17May/070

RUN FOR PRESIDENT, DAMN YOU!

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An excerpt from the new Al Gore book, "The Assault On Reason," coming out on May 22nd is posted right now on Time.com(via Atrios). Definitely worth the read, very powerful writing. I love this section:

As a college student, I wrote my senior thesis on the impact of television on the balance of power among the three branches of government. In the study, I pointed out the growing importance of visual rhetoric and body language over logic and reason. There are countless examples of this, but perhaps understandably, the first one that comes to mind is from the 2000 campaign, long before the Supreme Court decision and the hanging chads, when the controversy over my sighs in the first debate with George W. Bush created an impression on television that for many viewers outweighed whatever positive benefits I might have otherwise gained in the verbal combat of ideas and substance. A lot of good that senior thesis did me.

I was also extremely pleased to see the direction this essay took at the end:

Fortunately, the Internet has the potential to revitalize the role played by the people in our constitutional framework. It has extremely low entry barriers for individuals. It is the most interactive medium in history and the one with the greatest potential for connecting individuals to one another and to a universe of knowledge. It's a platform for pursuing the truth, and the decentralized creation and distribution of ideas, in the same way that markets are a decentralized mechanism for the creation and distribution of goods and services. It's a platform, in other words, for reason. But the Internet must be developed and protected, in the same way we develop and protect markets—through the establishment of fair rules of engagement and the exercise of the rule of law. The same ferocity that our Founders devoted to protect the freedom and independence of the press is now appropriate for our defense of the freedom of the Internet. The stakes are the same: the survival of our Republic. We must ensure that the Internet remains open and accessible to all citizens without any limitation on the ability of individuals to choose the content they wish regardless of the Internet service provider they use to connect to the Web. We cannot take this future for granted. We must be prepared to fight for it, because of the threat of corporate consolidation and control over the Internet marketplace of ideas.

The danger arises because there is, in most markets, a very small number of broadband network operators. These operators have the structural capacity to determine the way in which information is transmitted over the Internet and the speed with which it is delivered. And the present Internet network operators—principally large telephone and cable companies—have an economic incentive to extend their control over the physical infrastructure of the network to leverage control of Internet content. If they went about it in the wrong way, these companies could institute changes that have the effect of limiting the free flow of information over the Internet in a number of troubling ways.

The democratization of knowledge by the print medium brought the Enlightenment. Now, broadband interconnection is supporting decentralized processes that reinvigorate democracy. We can see it happening before our eyes: As a society, we are getting smarter. Networked democracy is taking hold. You can feel it. We the people—as Lincoln put it, "even we here"—are collectively still the key to the survival of America's democracy.

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16May/070

E-Harmony v E-Harmony Policy

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A site called Chemistry.com is running ads right now that are taunting E-Harmony's no homosexual policy and E-Harmony is attempting to get the Chemistry.com ads removed from NBC and People Magazine(who have both thus far not complied). "No fair pointing out what we're doing!" Via Pandagon.

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15May/070

Surprise, Surprise, Lieberman remains a republican

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30 Helen's agree!
Or at least Jane Hamsher from FDL and Hugh S. Bailey of ConnPost.com do.

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15May/070

Se aprovechan!!!

Posted by rabidchild

New TMBG album, The Else, is up on Itunes. Sounds good so far, some sorta guitar sound going on...

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14May/071

The votification

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I just finished a Salon article on voting rights and voter suppression, which mostly says things you probably already know about lots of new laws making it more difficult to vote in lots of states. One thing at the end of the article really struck me though:

For that matter, why not just move the entire country to the vote-by-mail system we use in my home state of Oregon? It's quick, it's convenient, it leaves a paper trail, and we have had no credible accusations of voter fraud since it was adopted during the 1990s -- and a stunning 86 percent of registered voters cast ballots in the 2004 presidential election.

Why the hell DON'T we do that? That seems like an excellent plan to me.

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